Stein

Effects of phytase on phosphorus digestibility of rice co-products fed to growing pigs

Casas, G. A. and H. H. Stein. 2015. Effects of phytase on phosphorus digestibility of rice co-products fed to growing pigs. J. Anim. Sci. 93(Suppl. 2):54-55 (Abstr.) Link to abstract (.pdf)

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Effect of diets formulated based on standardized total tract digestible phosphorus fed to growing pigs

Abelilla, J. J., R. C. Sulabo, H. H. Stein, S. P. Acda, A. A. Angeles, M. C. R. Oliveros, and F. E. Merca. 2015. Effect of diets formulated based on standardized total tract digestible phosphorus fed to growing pigs. J. Anim. Sci. 93(Suppl. 2):52-53 (Abstr.) Link to abstract (.pdf)

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Effect of particle size in calcium carbonate on apparent and standardized total tract digestibility and retention of calcium by growing pigs

Merriman, L. A. and H. H. Stein. 2015. Effect of particle size in calcium carbonate on apparent and standardized total tract digestibility and retention of calcium by growing pigs. J. Anim. Sci. 93(Suppl. 2):52 (Abstr.) Link to abstract (.pdf)

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Digestible calcium requirements and calcium and phosphorus balance for weanling pigs

González-Vega, J. C., C. L. Walk, and H. H. Stein. 2015. Digestible calcium requirements and calcium and phosphorus balance for weanling pigs. J. Anim. Sci. 93(Suppl. 2):51-52 (Abstr.) Link to abstract (.pdf)

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Comparative digestibility of energy and nutrients in diets fed to sows and growing pigs

Lowell, J. E., Y. Liu, and H. H. Stein. 2015. Comparative digestibility of energy and nutrients in diets fed to sows and growing pigs. Arch. Anim. Nutr. 69:79-97. Link to full text (.pdf)

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Effects of xylanase on the concentration of digestible and metabolizable energy in rice co-products fed to weaning pigs

Several co-products from rice processing can be used as animal feed. Brown rice is the whole rice grain that is left after the hull layer has been removed, leaving the germ, starchy endosperm, and bran. Rice bran is the outer brown layer of brown rice, which is removed to produce white rice. It is high in fiber, and also contains about 15% crude protein and 14 to 20% fat. Rice bran can be fed as full fat rice bran or defatted rice bran. Broken rice, or brewer's rice, consists of white rice grains that have been damaged in processing. It is high in starch and contains little fat, fiber, or protein (Table 1).

Non–starch polysaccharides (NSPs), primarily arabinoxylan and cellulose, comprise 20 to 25% of defatted rice bran. NSPs reduce nutrient absorption and energy digestibility. Addition of exogenous xylanase to wheat co-products, which also have high concentration of NSPs, may improve digestibility of energy, but there is limited information about the effects of adding exogenous xylanases to rice co-products. Therefore, an experiment was conducted to determine the effect on concentrations of digestible energy (DE) and metabolizable energy (ME) of adding exogenous xylanase to diets containing full fat rice bran (FFRB), defatted rice bran (DFRB), brown rice, or broken rice.

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Digestibility of energy and detergent fiber and digestible and metabolizable energy values in canola meal, 00-rapeseed meal, and 00-rapeseed expellers fed to growing pigs

Maison, T., Y. Liu, and H. H. Stein. 2015. Digestibility of energy and detergent fiber and digestible and metabolizable energy values in canola meal, 00-rapeseed meal, and 00-rapeseed expellers fed to growing pigs. J. Anim. Sci. 93:652-660. Link to full text (.pdf)

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Effects of fiber on the optimal threonine:lysine ratio for 25 to 50 kg growing gilts

Use of high-fiber, low-cost ingredients, such as co-products from grain processing industries, in swine diets is increasing. Pigs fed diets containing high levels of fiber have increased intestinal mass due to increased amount of microbial fermentation in the hindgut. Therefore, they also have increased endogenous loss of amino acids in the form of mucins, the proteins that line the intestinal tract. The abrasiveness of fiber stimulates the secretion of mucins as well. These factors may cause the threonine requirement to be increased in high fiber diets, because threonine is present in large amounts in mucins. Therefore, an experiment was conducted to determine the effects of dietary fiber on the optimum threonine:lysine ratio (Thr:Lys) in 25 to 50 kg growing gilts.

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Impact of particle size reduction on feed cost and feed efficiency

Rojas, O. J. and H. H. Stein. 2015. Impact of particle size reduction on feed cost and feed efficiency. Pages 207-227 in Proc. Banff Pork Seminar, Banff, AB, Canada, Jan. 20-22, 2015. Link to full text (.pdf)

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Effects of feeding high protein or conventional canola meal on dry cured and conventionally cured bacon

Little, K. L., B. M. Bohrer, H. H. Stein, and D. D. Boler. 2015. Effects of feeding high protein or conventional canola meal on dry cured and conventionally cured bacon. Meat Sci. 103:28-38. Link to full text (.pdf)

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Effects of replacing fish, chicken, or poultry by-product meal with fermented soybean meal in diets fed to weanling pigs

Rojas, O. J. and H. H. Stein. 2015. Effects of replacing fish, chicken, or poultry by-product meal with fermented soybean meal in diets fed to weanling pigs. Rev. Colomb. Cienc. Pecu. 28:22-41. Link to full text (.pdf)

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Effect of particle size in calcium carbonate on apparent and standardized total tract digestibility and retention of calcium by growing pigs

Particle size is an important consideration for some feed ingredients in pig diets. Reducing the particle size of cereal grains and soybean meal in diets fed to pigs improves digestibility of energy, amino acids, and other nutrients, because feed ground to smaller particle sizes has more surface area on which digestive enzymes can work.

The particle size of inorganic calcium sources has been shown to affect calcium retention in poultry. Particle sizes of 1.00 mm or greater are recommended to optimize calcium retention and eggshell quality in laying hens, but coarse particle sizes result in reduced calcium retention in broiler chicks.  However, little is known about the effect of particle size of calcium sources fed to pigs. Therefore, an experiment was conducted to test different particle sizes of calcium carbonate and determine which size optimizes calcium digestibility and retention by growing pigs.

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Effects of pelleting and extrusion on energy and nutrient digestibility in diets fed to pigs

Pelleting and extrusion are technologies that have been used in livestock feeding to improve nutrient digestibility and feed conversion. Recent research concluded that reduced performance of pigs fed diets containing high concentrations of fiber was ameliorated if the diets were pelleted. Extrusion is also of benefit in high fiber diets, because it may increase the solubility of dietary fiber. It is possible that the benefits of extrusion and pelleting are greater in high fiber diets than in low fiber diets, but this hypothesis has not been investigated. Therefore, an experiment was conducted to determine effects of extrusion and pelleting on energy and nutrient digestibility in diets containing low, medium, or high concentrations of fiber.

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Energy concentration and phosphorus digestibility in yeast products produced from the ethanol industry, and in brewers’ yeast, fish meal, and soybean meal fed to growing pigs

Kim, B. G, Y. Liu, and H. H. Stein. 2014. Energy concentration and phosphorus digestibility in yeast products produced from the ethanol industry, and in brewers’ yeast, fish meal, and soybean meal fed to growing pigs. J. Anim. Sci. 92:5476-5484. Link to full text (.pdf)

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Phosphorus digestibility in rice co-products fed to growing pigs

After corn and wheat, rice is the third most widely grown cereal grain worldwide. Most rice is processed to produce polished white rice for human consumption, and several co-products result from this processing. First, the outer husk, or hull, of the grain is removed. The dehulled grain, consisting of the bran, germ, and endosperm, is brown rice. To produce white rice, the brown rice is milled further and the bran is removed. Rice bran is high in fiber, and also contains about 15% crude protein and 14 to 20% fat. Rice bran can be fed as full fat rice bran or defatted rice bran. Rice bran is sometimes combined with rice hulls to produce rice mill feed. During milling of the rice, some kernels may get broken and cannot be used for human consumption. These broken kernels are known as broken rice or brewers rice and may also be used in animal feeding.

The phosphorus content of rice is similar to that of corn. Most of the phosphorus in rice is in the bran fraction, and 80-85% of the phosphorus in rice bran is bound to phytate, which limits its digestibility by pigs. Microbial phytase can be used in swine diets to increase the digestibility of phytate-bound phosphorus. However, limited information exists about phosphorus digestibility in rice co-products and how it is affected by microbial phytase. Therefore, an experiment was conducted to determine the apparent (ATTD) and standardized (STTD) total tract digestibility of phosphorus in brown rice, broken rice, full fat rice bran (FFRB), defatted rice bran (DFRB), and rice mill feed fed to growing pigs. A second objective of the experiment was to determine the effect of microbial phytase on phosphorus digestibility in rice co-products.

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Effects of extrusion of corn and oats on the digestibility of energy, crude protein, and fiber in diets fed to pigs

In extrusion, cereal grains are processed under conditions of heat and pressure. Like other types of heat treatment, extrusion may reduce the concentration of antinutritional factors. Extrusion also gelatinizes starch, improving its digestibility. Improved digestibility of starch should, in turn, lead to an increase in digestible energy. Extrusion has also been shown in some studies to solubilize the insoluble fraction of the fiber which would also increase fiber digestibility and digestible energy.

Corn is a high starch ingredient, while oats are high in fiber. An experiment was conducted to determine the effects of extruding corn and oats on the apparent total tract digestibility (ATTD) of energy and fiber when fed to growing pigs.

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Concentration of metabolizable energy and digestibility of energy, phosphorus, and amino acids in lemna protein concentrate fed to growing pigs

Rojas, O. J., Y. Liu, and H. H. Stein. 2014. Concentration of metabolizable energy and digestibility of energy, phosphorus, and amino acids in lemna protein concentrate fed to growing pigs. J. Anim. Sci. 92:5222-5229. Link to full text (.pdf)

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Supplementation of organic and inorganic selenium to diets using grains grown in various regions of the United States with differing natural Se concentrations and fed to grower–finisher swine

Mahan, D. C., M. Azain, T. D. Crenshaw, G. L. Cromwell, C. R. Dove, S. W. Kim, M. D. Lindemann, P. S. Miller, J. E. Pettigrew, H. H. Stein, and E. van Heugten. 2014. Supplementation of organic and inorganic selenium to diets using grains grown in various regions of the United States with differing natural Se concentrations and fed to grower-finisher swine. J. Anim. Sci. 92:4991-4997. Link to full text (.pdf)

Effects of co-products from the corn-ethanol industry on body composition, retention of protein, lipids and energy, and on the net energy of diets fed to growing or finishing pigs

Gutierrez, N. A., D. Y. Kil, Y. Liu, J. E. Pettigrew, and H. H. Stein. 2014. Effects of co-products from the corn-ethanol industry on body composition, retention of protein, lipids and energy, and on the net energy of diets fed to growing or finishing pigs. J. Sci. Food Agric. 94:3008-3016. Link to full text (.pdf)

Energy concentration and amino acid digestibility in corn and corn coproducts from the wet-milling industry fed to growing pigs

Liu, Y., M. Song, F. N. Almeida, S. L. Tilton, M. J. Cecava, and H. H. Stein. 2014. Energy concentration and amino acid digestibility in corn and corn coproducts from the wet-milling industry fed to growing pigs. J. Anim. Sci. 92:4557-4565. Link to full text (.pdf)

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