Barley

Effects of microbial phytase on standardized total tract digestibility of phosphorus in hybrid rye, barley, wheat, corn, and sorghum fed to growing pigs

Until recently, rye has been less suitable for livestock feed than other cereal grains due to the risk of ergot contamination. However, recently developed hybrids are less susceptible to ergot contamination. There is limited information about the nutritional value of hybrid rye when fed to pigs.

In cereal grains, most of the phosphorus is bound to phytic acid, and is not available to pigs unless phytase is present. This is usually achieved by adding supplemental phytase, derived from microbes, to the diets. However, rye contains more intrinsic phytase than other cereal grains, so the phosphorus in rye may be more digestible. The addition of microbial phytase might also have less of an effect on phosphorus digestibility in rye than in other grains because of the high concentrations of intrinsic phytase in rye, but limited information about digestibility of phosphorus in rye has been reported.

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Standardized ileal digestibility of amino acids in three sources of hybrids of rye and in barley, wheat, and corn fed to growing pigs

McGhee, M. L. and H. H. Stein. 2018. Standardized ileal digestibility of amino acids in three sources of hybrids of rye and in barley, wheat, and corn fed to growing pigs. J. Anim. Sci. 96(Suppl. 2):142 (Abstr.) Link to abstract (.pdf)

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Ileal digestibility of amino acids and starch in hybrid rye compared with other cereal grains fed to pigs

Hybrid rye is grown in Europe, Canada, and the United States, and compared with conventional rye, it has increased yields and reduced risk of ergot contamination, making it an interesting ingredient in the feeding of pigs. However, there is limited information about the nutritional value of hybrid rye when fed to pigs. Therefore, the objective of the experiment was to determine the standardized ileal digestibility (SID) of crude protein and amino acids, as well as the apparent ileal digestibility (AID) of starch in hybrid rye compared with barley, wheat, and corn.

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Effects of dietary barley on growth performance, carcass traits and pork quality of finishing pigs

Kim, B. G., D. M. Wulf, R. J. Maddock, D. N. Peters, C. Pedersen, Y. Liu, and H. H. Stein. 2014. Effects of dietary barley on growth performance, carcass traits and pork quality of finishing pigs. Rev. Colomb. Cienc. Pecu. 27:102-113. Link to full text

Digestible indispensable amino acid score and digestible amino acids in eight cereal grains

Cervantes-Pahm, S. K., Y. Liu, and H. H. Stein. 2014. Digestible indispensable amino acid score and digestible amino acids in eight cereal grains. Brit. J. Nutr. 111:1663-1672. Link to full text (.pdf)

Comparative digestibility of energy and nutrients and fermentability of dietary fiber in eight cereal grains fed to pigs

Cervantes-Pahm, S. K., Y. Liu, and H. H. Stein. 2014. Comparative digestibility of energy and nutrients and fermentability of dietary fiber in eight cereal grains fed to pigs. J. Sci. Food Agric. 94:841–849. Link to full text (.pdf)

Metabolizable energy and digestibility of carbohydrates in cereal grains fed to growing pigs

Cervantes-Pahm, S. K. and H. H. Stein. 2011. Metabolizable energy and digestibility of carbohydrates in cereal grains fed to growing pigs. J. Anim. Sci. 89(E-Suppl. 1):332-333 (Abstr.) Link to abstract (.pdf)

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Use of small grains in pig production

By Dr. Hans H. Stein

July, 2011

We are now at a time of the year when most of the small grain crops have been harvested, but we are still a few month away from having new-crop corn available. In many areas of the Midwest, it is, therefore, possible to purchase wheat, barley, or oats at a price that is less than that of corn. In many cases, this is an opportunity to reduce diet costs. With corn trading close to 7 dollars per bushel, there may be opportunities for reducing diet costs if small grains are available.

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Energy and nutrient concentration and digestibility in alternative feed ingredients and recommended inclusion rates

Stein, H. H. 2011. Energy and nutrient concentration and digestibility in alternative feed ingredients and recommended inclusion rates. In Proceedings of the American Association of Swine Veterinarians 42nd Annual Meeting. Phoenix, AZ. Link to full text (.pdf)

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Nucleotide deficiencies in starter diets for weanling pigs

Mateo, C. D. and H. H. Stein. 2004. Page 55 in Nutritional Biotechnology in the Feed Industry. Proc. Alltech's 20th Annual Symp., Lexington, KY, USA, May 23-26, 2004, Suppl. 1 (Abstr.) Link to abstract (.pdf)

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Alternative grain sources in diets fed to pigs

Stein, H. H. 2009. Alternative grain sources in diets fed to pigs. Pages 163-179 in Proc. Retos Y Elternativas Para La Production Animal Tropical. Ensminger School, February 11-13, 2009, San Jose, Costa Rica. Link to full text (.pdf)

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