Fish meal

Effects of replacing fish, chicken, or poultry by-product meal with fermented soybean meal in diets fed to weanling pigs

Rojas, O. J. and H. H. Stein. 2015. Effects of replacing fish, chicken, or poultry by-product meal with fermented soybean meal in diets fed to weanling pigs. Rev. Colomb. Cienc. Pecu. 28:22-41. Link to full text (.pdf)

Authors: 

Energy concentration and phosphorus digestibility in yeast products produced from the ethanol industry, and in brewers’ yeast, fish meal, and soybean meal fed to growing pigs

Kim, B. G, Y. Liu, and H. H. Stein. 2014. Energy concentration and phosphorus digestibility in yeast products produced from the ethanol industry, and in brewers’ yeast, fish meal, and soybean meal fed to growing pigs. J. Anim. Sci. 92:5476-5484. Link to full text (.pdf)

Authors: 

Amino acid digestibility in field peas, fish meal, corn, soybean meal, and soybean hulls

Mathai, J. K. and H. H. Stein. 2014. Amino acid digestibility in field peas, fish meal, corn, soybean meal, and soybean hulls. J. Anim. Sci 92(E-Suppl. 2):648 (Abstr.) Link to abstract (.pdf)

Authors: 
Publication Type: 

Effect of fiber and fat on calculated values for standardized total tract digestibility of calcium in fish meal

González-Vega, J. C., C. L. Walk, and H. H. Stein. 2014. Effect of fiber and fat on calculated values for standardized total tract digestibility of calcium in fish meal. J. Anim. Sci 92(E-Suppl. 2):231-232 (Abstr.) Link to abstract (.pdf)

Publication Type: 

Energy and phosphorus digestibility by weanling pigs of Lemna Protein Concentrate, fish meal, and soybean meal

Lemna Protein Concentrate (LPC) is derived from the leaves of duckweed, one of several rapidly-growing aquatic plants of the genus Lemna. LPC is produced by de-oiling and de-hydrating leaves and stems of the duckweed plant. Duckweed has a number of advantages as a protein source. It is relatively inexpensive to produce and requires less growing area and fewer inputs than other plant protein sources such as soybean products. In addition, LPC has a favorable amino acid profile for use in swine diets. No published data exist on the nutritional value of LPC as fed to pigs. Therefore, two experiments were conducted to determine the concentration of digestible and metabolizable energy and the digestibility of phosphorus in Lemna Protein Concentrate.

Authors: 
Publication Type: 

Concentration of digestible, metabolizable, and net energy and digestibility of energy and nutrients in fermented soybean meal, conventional soybean meal, and fish meal fed to weanling pigs

Rojas, O. J. and H. H. Stein. 2013. Concentration of digestible, metabolizable, and net energy and digestibility of energy and nutrients in fermented soybean meal, conventional soybean meal, and fish meal fed to weanling pigs. J. Anim. Sci. 91:4397-4405. Link to full text (.pdf)

Authors: 

Nutritional value of animal proteins fed to pigs

Rojas, O. J. and H. H. Stein. 2012. Nutritional value of animal proteins fed to pigs. Pages 9-24 in Proc. Midwest Swine Nutr. Conf. Indianapolis, IN, Sep. 13, 2012. Link to full text (.pdf)

Authors: 
Publication Type: 

Energy, phosphorus, and amino acid digestibility in Lemna protein concentrate, fish meal, and soybean meal fed to weanling pigs

Rojas, O. J. and H. H. Stein. 2012. Energy, phosphorus, and amino acid digestibility in Lemna protein concentrate, fish meal, and soybean meal fed to weanling pigs. J. Anim. Sci. 90(E-Suppl. 3):467 (Abstr.) Link to abstract (.pdf)

Authors: 
Publication Type: 

Effects of replacing chicken meal or poultry by-product meal with fermented soybean meal in phase 1, phase 2, and phase 3 diets fed to weanling pigs

Animal proteins such as milk products, blood products, fish meal, chicken meal (CM), and poultry by-product meal (PBM) are usually used as amino acid sources in diets for weanling pigs because the nutrients in these ingredients are highly digestible and because they do not contain the anti-nutritional factors that are present in conventional soybean meal. Due to the cost of animal protein sources, other alternatives have been investigated. One alternative is soybean meal which has been fermented to destroy antinutritional factors and increase protein digestibility. Fermented soybean meal (FSBM) has been shown to be able to replace milk, blood proteins, and fish meal in diets fed to weanling pigs. However, there are no data on whether or not fermented soybean meal can replace chicken meal and poultry by-product meal. An experiment was, therefore, performed to test the hypothesis that fermented soybean meal can replace chicken meal and poultry by-product meal in diets fed to weanling pigs without negatively affecting growth performance.

Authors: 
Publication Type: 

Effects of replacing fish meal with fermented soybean meal in phase 1, phase 2, and phase 3 diets fed to weanling pigs

Animal proteins such as milk products, blood products, fish meal, chicken meal, and poultry by-product meal are usually used as amino acid sources in diets for weanling pigs because the nutrients in these ingredients are highly digestible and because they do not contain the anti-nutritional factors that are present  in conventional soybean meal. Due to the cost of animal protein sources, other alternatives have been investigated. One alternative is soybean meal which has been fermented to destroy antinutritional factors and increase protein digestibility. Fermented soybean meal (FSBM) may partly replace milk and blood proteins in diets fed to weanling pigs from seven to 21 days post-weaning. However, there are no data on the inclusion of more than 10% FSBM in diets fed to weanling pigs. Therefore, two experiments were conducted to test the hypothesis that FSBM may be included in diets fed to weanling pigs to replace all animal protein sources.

Authors: 
Publication Type: 

Concentration of energy and digestibility of energy and nutrients in fermented soybean meal fed to weanling pigs

Soybean meal is a rich source of digestible amino acids for pigs. However, soybeans contain antinutritional factors such as antigenic proteins, oligosaccharides, lectins, and trypsin inhibitors that make soybeans and conventional soybean meal unsuitable for feeding to weanling pigs in great quantities. Therefore, animal protein is usually included in starter diets for pigs. Because soy protein is less expensive than the animal protein, strategies to reduce the antinutritional factors in soy products have been explored. Fermentation of soybean meal with bacteria such as Aspergillus oryzae and Lactobacillus subtilis eliminates many antinutritional factors, and studies have shown that fermented soybean meal is well-tolerated by weanling pigs. However, there is a lack of data on the digestibility of energy and amino acids in fermented soybean meal. Two experiments were, therefore, conducted to measure the concentration of DE and ME and the digestibility of amino acids in fermented soybean meal and to compare these values to values obtained in conventional soybean meal and fish meal.

Authors: 
Publication Type: 

Concentration of DE and ME in fermented soybean meal, conventional soybean meal, and fish meal fed to weanling pigs

Rojas, O. J. and H. H. Stein. 2011. Concentration of DE and ME in fermented soybean meal, conventional soybean meal, and fish meal fed to weanling pigs. J. Anim. Sci. 89(E-Suppl. 1):333 (Abstr.) Link to abstract (.pdf)

Authors: 
Publication Type: 

Energy concentration and phosphorus digestibility in yeast products, fish meal, and soybean meal fed to growing pigs

Kim, B. G. and H. H. Stein. 2010. Energy concentration and phosphorus digestibility in yeast products, fish meal, and soybean meal fed to growing pigs. J. Anim. Sci. 88(E-Suppl. 3):86 (Abstr.) Link to abstract (.pdf)

Authors: 
Publication Type: 

Ileal digestibility of amino acids in conventional, fermented, and enzyme-treated soybean meal and in soy protein isolate, fish meal, and casein fed to weanling pigs

Cervantes-Pahm, S. F., and H. H. Stein. 2010. Ileal digestibility of amino acids in conventional, fermented, and enzyme treated soybean meal and in soy protein isolate, fishmeal, and casein fed to weanling pigs. J. Anim. Sci.  88:2674-2683. Link to full text (.pdf)

Alternatives to fish meal in diets fed to weanling pigs

By Dr. Hans H. Stein

July, 2010

Increased global demand for fish meal has resulted in rapidly increased costs of fish meal during the last 6 month. The recent shutdown of many fish processing facilities in the Gulf area has exacerbated the situation and many producers are no longer able to secure fish meal for their pigs. It is, therefore necessary to look for alternatives to fish meal in diets fed to swine.

Authors: 
Publication Type: 

Intestinal digestibility of amino acids in rumen undegraded protein estimated using a precision-fed rooster bioassay: II. Distillers dried grains with solubles and fish meal

Boucher, S. E., S. Calsamiglia, C. M. Parsons, H. H. Stein, M. D. Stern, P. S. Erickson, P. L. Utterback, and C. G. Schwab. 2009. Intestinal digestibility of amino acids in rumen undegraded protein estimated using a precision-fed rooster bioassay: II. Distillers dried grains with solubles and fish meal. J. Dairy Sci. 92:6056-6067. Link to full text (.pdf)

Amino acid digestibility of protein sources fed to weanling pigs

Cervantes-Pahm, S. F., and H. H. Stein. 2007. Amino acid digestibility of protein sources fed to weanling pigs. J. Anim. Sci. 85(Suppl. 2):105 (Abstr.) Link to abstract (.pdf)

Publication Type: 

Nucleotide deficiencies in starter diets for weanling pigs

Mateo, C. D. and H. H. Stein. 2004. Page 55 in Nutritional Biotechnology in the Feed Industry. Proc. Alltech's 20th Annual Symp., Lexington, KY, USA, May 23-26, 2004, Suppl. 1 (Abstr.) Link to abstract (.pdf)

Authors: 
Publication Type: 

Apparent ileal digestibility of weanling pigs fed diets supplemented with fishmeal as a protein source

Kim, S. W., H. H. Stein, and R. A. Easter. 1997. Apparent ileal digestibility of weanling pigs fed diets supplemented with fishmeal as a protein source. J. Anim. Sci. 75(Suppl. 1):61 (Abstr.)

Authors: 
Publication Type: