Hybrid rye

Pigs prefer diets containing corn to diets containing hybrid rye when given the choice, but growth performance is not reduced when hybrid rye replaces corn in diets for growing pigs

In many parts of the world, including the United States, corn is the primary energy source used in diets for pigs, but there are no published data comparing the growth performance of growing pigs fed diets in which hybrid rye replaces corn. Unfamiliarity with hybrid rye also makes some producers in the United States reluctant to try feeding hybrid rye to pigs, as there is a long-standing belief that rye is less palatable than other feed ingredients. Therefore, two experiments were conducted to test the hypotheses that there is no difference in feed preference for diets containing either hybrid rye or corn as the exclusive cereal grain source, and that hybrid rye may replace a portion of corn in diets for growing pigs without adversely affecting growth. 

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Hybrid rye instead of corn does not impede pig growth

McGhee, M. L., and H. H. Stein. 2020. Hybrid rye instead of corn does not impede pig growth. National Hog Farmer, Online edition, April 30, 2020.

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Effects of inclusion of hybrid rye in diets on growth performance and diarrhea incidence of weanling pigs

Production of hybrid rye in North America is increasing after being introduced to Canada and the United States in 2014 and 2016, respectively. Compared with corn, hybrid rye contains similar amounts of standardized ileal digestible amino acids, a greater concentration of standardized total tract digestible P, and approximately 94% of the metabolizable energy. Hybrid rye contains more fermentable dietary fiber than corn, which has the potential to improve gut health, but its reduced digestibility of amino acids may simultaneously have a negative impact on the health of the large intestine. Two experiments were conducted to determine the maximum amount of hybrid rye that can be included in diets for weanling pigs without influencing growth performance or diarrhea incidence.

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PSIV-1 Apparent ileal and total tract digestibility of energy and carbohydrates in hybrid rye and other cereal grains fed to growing pigs

McGhee Molly L., Hans H. Stein. 2019. PSIV-1 Apparent ileal and total tract digestibility of energy and carbohydrates in hybrid rye and other cereal grains fed to growing pigs. Journal of Animal Science, Volume 97, Issue Supplement_2, July 2019, Pages 183–184. (Abstr.). Link to abstract. 

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Effects of microbial phytase on standardized total tract digestibility of phosphorus in hybrid rye, barley, wheat, corn, and sorghum fed to growing pigs

McGhee, Molly L., Hans H. Stein. 2019. Effects of microbial phytase on standardized total tract digestibility of phosphorus in hybrid rye, barley, wheat, corn, and sorghum fed to growing pigs. Transl. Anim. Sci. 2019.  Volume 3, Issue 4, Pages 1238–1245. Link to full text.

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Hybrid rye holds promise as feed ingredient in North America

McGhee, M. L., and H. H. Stein. 2018. Hybrid rye holds promise as feed ingredient in North America. National Hog Farmer, On line edition, Aug. 30, 2018. Link to full text.

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