McGhee

Pigs prefer diets containing corn to diets containing hybrid rye when given the choice, but growth performance is not reduced when hybrid rye replaces corn in diets for growing pigs

In many parts of the world, including the United States, corn is the primary energy source used in diets for pigs, but there are no published data comparing the growth performance of growing pigs fed diets in which hybrid rye replaces corn. Unfamiliarity with hybrid rye also makes some producers in the United States reluctant to try feeding hybrid rye to pigs, as there is a long-standing belief that rye is less palatable than other feed ingredients. Therefore, two experiments were conducted to test the hypotheses that there is no difference in feed preference for diets containing either hybrid rye or corn as the exclusive cereal grain source, and that hybrid rye may replace a portion of corn in diets for growing pigs without adversely affecting growth. 

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Hybrid rye instead of corn does not impede pig growth

McGhee, M. L., and H. H. Stein. 2020. Hybrid rye instead of corn does not impede pig growth. National Hog Farmer, Online edition, April 30, 2020.

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Effects of including two sources of copper hydroxychloride in diets for growing-finishing pigs

Recent research conducted at the University of Illinois Swine Research Center demonstrated positive effects of feeding copper hydroxychloride to weanling pigs, including improved growth performance and positive changes in intestinal health. It is, however, not known if copper hydroxychloride would also elicit positive effects in growing-finishing pigs. Additionally, it is also not known if the positive effects of copper hydroxychloride are obtained regardless of the origin of the mineral, or if the response is specific to the product produced by a specific supplier. Therefore, an experiment was conducted to test the hypothesis that inclusion of copper hydroxychloride in diets for growing-finishing pigs would improve growth performance, and secondly that the origin of the copper hydroxychloride is not important for the outcome.

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Effects of inclusion of hybrid rye in diets on growth performance and diarrhea incidence of weanling pigs

Production of hybrid rye in North America is increasing after being introduced to Canada and the United States in 2014 and 2016, respectively. Compared with corn, hybrid rye contains similar amounts of standardized ileal digestible amino acids, a greater concentration of standardized total tract digestible P, and approximately 94% of the metabolizable energy. Hybrid rye contains more fermentable dietary fiber than corn, which has the potential to improve gut health, but its reduced digestibility of amino acids may simultaneously have a negative impact on the health of the large intestine. Two experiments were conducted to determine the maximum amount of hybrid rye that can be included in diets for weanling pigs without influencing growth performance or diarrhea incidence.

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Gestating and lactating sows perform with hybrid rye

McGhee, M. L., and H. H. Stein.  2019. Gestating and lactating sows perform with hybrid rye. National Hog Farmer, On line edition, Oct. 31, 2019. Link to full text.

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PSIV-1 Apparent ileal and total tract digestibility of energy and carbohydrates in hybrid rye and other cereal grains fed to growing pigs

McGhee Molly L., Hans H. Stein. 2019. PSIV-1 Apparent ileal and total tract digestibility of energy and carbohydrates in hybrid rye and other cereal grains fed to growing pigs. Journal of Animal Science, Volume 97, Issue Supplement_2, July 2019, Pages 183–184. (Abstr.). Link to abstract. 

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Effects of microbial phytase on standardized total tract digestibility of phosphorus in hybrid rye, barley, wheat, corn, and sorghum fed to growing pigs

McGhee, Molly L., Hans H. Stein. 2019. Effects of microbial phytase on standardized total tract digestibility of phosphorus in hybrid rye, barley, wheat, corn, and sorghum fed to growing pigs. Transl. Anim. Sci. 2019.  Volume 3, Issue 4, Pages 1238–1245. Link to full text.

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Hybrid rye holds promise as feed ingredient in North America

McGhee, M. L., and H. H. Stein. 2018. Hybrid rye holds promise as feed ingredient in North America. National Hog Farmer, On line edition, Aug. 30, 2018. Link to full text.

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Apparent and standardized ileal digestibility of AA and starch in hybrid rye, barley, wheat, and corn fed to growing pigs

McGhee Molly L. and Hans. H. Stein. 2018. Apparent and standardized ileal digestibility of AA and starch in hybrid rye, barley, wheat, and corn fed to growing pigs. J. Anim. Sci. 96:3319–3329.  Link to full text.

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Effects of microbial phytase on standardized total tract digestibility of phosphorus in hybrid rye, barley, wheat, corn, and sorghum fed to growing pigs

Until recently, rye has been less suitable for livestock feed than other cereal grains due to the risk of ergot contamination. However, recently developed hybrids are less susceptible to ergot contamination. There is limited information about the nutritional value of hybrid rye when fed to pigs.

In cereal grains, most of the phosphorus is bound to phytic acid, and is not available to pigs unless phytase is present. This is usually achieved by adding supplemental phytase, derived from microbes, to the diets. However, rye contains more intrinsic phytase than other cereal grains, so the phosphorus in rye may be more digestible. The addition of microbial phytase might also have less of an effect on phosphorus digestibility in rye than in other grains because of the high concentrations of intrinsic phytase in rye, but limited information about digestibility of phosphorus in rye has been reported.

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Standardized ileal digestibility of amino acids in three sources of hybrids of rye and in barley, wheat, and corn fed to growing pigs

McGhee, M. L. and H. H. Stein. 2018. Standardized ileal digestibility of amino acids in three sources of hybrids of rye and in barley, wheat, and corn fed to growing pigs. J. Anim. Sci. 96(Suppl. 2):142 (Abstr.) Link to abstract (.pdf)

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Ileal digestibility of amino acids and starch in hybrid rye compared with other cereal grains fed to pigs

Hybrid rye is grown in Europe, Canada, and the United States, and compared with conventional rye, it has increased yields and reduced risk of ergot contamination, making it an interesting ingredient in the feeding of pigs. However, there is limited information about the nutritional value of hybrid rye when fed to pigs. Therefore, the objective of the experiment was to determine the standardized ileal digestibility (SID) of crude protein and amino acids, as well as the apparent ileal digestibility (AID) of starch in hybrid rye compared with barley, wheat, and corn.

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