Acosta

Reproductive performance and immune status of sows fed diets containing Olextra 1200 during lactation

The olive oil tree (Olea europaea L.) contains hydrophilic and lipophilic bioactive compounds, which include flavones, phenolic acids, phenolic alcohols, secoiridoids, and hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives. These bioactive compounds have anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, and antioxidant properties, and therefore, olive-derived plant bioactive compounds may reduce chronic inflammation and intestinal integrity in pigs. Therefore, olive-derived plant bioactive compounds, such as Olextra 1200, may improve health and prevent disease by inhibiting B cell activation and cytokine expression. However, there is a lack of data demonstrating effects of olive extracts on reproductive performance of sows and their offspring. Therefore, the objective of this experiment was to test the hypothesis that dietary supplementation of Olextra 1200 increases reproductive performance as well as the immune status of sows.

Authors: 
Publication Type: 

Does xylanase impact gestating, lactating sow digestibility?

Acosta, J. P., and H. H. Stein. 2023. Does xylanase impact gestating, lactating sow digestibility? National Hog Farmer. On-line edition. Dec. 21, 2023.

Authors: 

Xylanase or a stimbiotic increased growth performance and total tract digestibility of nutrients in diets for weanling pigs, but feeding sows xylanase in lactation did not influence pig growth performance after weaning

Acosta, Jessica P., and Hans H. Stein. 2023. Xylanase or a stimbiotic increased growth performance and total tract digestibility of nutrients in diets for weanling pigs, but feeding sows xylanase in lactation did not influence pig growth performance after weaning. XXXVIII Curso de especializacion FEDNA. Pag 327. Link to abstract.

 

Authors: 
Publication Type: 

Concentration of Digestible Energy in Corn-Based Diets Fed to Gestating and Lactating Sows is Increased by Adding Xylanase to the Diets

Acosta Medellin, Jessica P., Charmaine D. Espinosa, Gemma Gonzalez Ortiz, Hans H. Stein. 2023. Concentration of Digestible Energy in Corn-Based Diets Fed to Gestating and Lactating Sows is Increased by Adding Xylanase to the Diets. J. Anim. Sci., Volume 101, Issue Supplement 2, Pages 35–36, doi.org/10.1093/jas/skad341.040. Link to abstract.

Publication Type: 

Xylanase and a stimbiotic increased growth performance and total tract digestibility of nutrients in diets for weanling pigs, but feeding sows xylanase in lactation did not influence pig growth performance

Arabinoxylans are the predominant fiber component in cereal grains and cereal co-products. They have a backbone of β-(1− 4) linked xylose units with side chains of arabinose, glucuronic acid, acetyl, and phenolic acids. Xylanase hydrolyzes the β-(1− 4) glycosidic bonds between xylose units in the backbone and releases a mixture of xylose and xylo-oligosaccharides that can be either absorbed or fermented by pigs. Previous data indicate that xylanase increased the degradation of dietary fiber and increased energy digestibility in diets for growing pigs and lactating sows. Xylo-oligosaccharides improve growth performance of nursery pigs because they serve as prebiotics that modulate gut microbiota. A stimbiotic (i.e., xylanase in combination with xylo-oligosaccharides) may improve growth performance of weanling pigs to a greater extent than either additive alone by shifting the intestinal microbiome to favor fiber fermentation. However, there are no data on possible effects of xylanase in sows diets on growth performance and intestinal health of the offspring or on the impact of the stimbiotic on digestibility of nutrients when fed to nursery pigs. Therefore, an experiment was conducted to test the hypothesis that xylanase or a stimbiotic improves growth performance and the apparent total tract digestibility (ATTD) of dry matter (DM), gross energy (GE), and total dietary fiber (TDF), and the concentration of digestible energy (DE) of diets for weanling pigs, but that the effect is greater in offspring of sows fed xylanase in lactation than in offspring of sows not fed xylanase.

Publication Type: 

Exogenous xylanase increases digestibility of energy and fiber in diets for gestating and lactating sows

Exogenous enzymes may improve the fermentability of dietary fiber in swine diets by hydrolyzing non-starch polysaccharides into oligosaccharides and sugars. In particular, the enzyme xylanase hydrolyzes the β-(1-4) glycosidic bonds between the xylose units in the backbone of arabinoxylans in cereal grains and grain coproducts, resulting in the release of a combination of xylose, arabinose, and xylo-oligosaccharides from arabinoxylans that can be fermented by pigs. Previous data indicate that xylanase increased the degradation of dietary fiber and increased energy digestibility in diets for growing pigs; however, there are limited data for the impact of xylanase on energy and fiber digestibility in gestating and lactating sows. Therefore, an experiment was conducted to test the hypothesis that exogenous xylanase added to diets for gestating and lactating sows will increase the apparent total tract digestibility (ATTD) of gross energy and total dietary fiber (TDF), and increase the concentrations of digestible energy (DE) and metabolizable energy (ME) during two reproductive cycles.

Publication Type: 

Weanling pigs consume more feed if hybrid rye replaces corn in diets, but average daily gain and fecal scores are not impacted by hybrid rye

McGhee, Molly L., Jessica P. Acosta, and Hans H. Stein. 2023. Weanling pigs consume more feed if hybrid rye replaces corn in diets, but average daily gain and fecal scores are not impacted by hybrid rye. Translational Animal Science, 7: 1–10. doi.org/10.1093/tas/txad022. Link to full text.

Authors: 

Corn protein has greater concentrations of digestible amino acids and energy than low-oil corn distillers dried grains with solubles when fed to pigs but does not affect the growth performance of weanling pigs

Acosta, Jessica P., Charmaine D. Espinosa, Neil W. Jaworski, and Hans H. Stein. 2021. Corn protein has greater concentrations of digestible amino acids and energy than low-oil corn distillers dried grains with solubles when fed to pigs but does not affect the growth performance of weanling pigs. Journal of Animal Science, 2021, Vol. 99, No. 7, 1–12. doi:10.1093/jas/skab175.

A Corn Protein Product Has Greater Concentration of Digestible Amino Acids and Energy Than Low-oil Distillers Dried Grains with Solubles When Fed to Pigs and May Be Used in Diets for Weanling Pigs

Acosta, J. P., C. D. Espinosa, N. Jaworski, and H. H. Stein. 2021. A Corn Protein Product Has Greater Concentration of Digestible Amino Acids and Energy Than Low-oil Distillers Dried Grains with Solubles When Fed to Pigs and May Be Used in Diets for Weanling Pigs. J. Anim. Sci. 99(Suppl. 1): 85–86. doi.org/10.1093/jas/skab054.139. Link to Abstract.

Publication Type: 

Digestibility of energy and concentrations of digestible and metabolizable energy in a high protein corn product fed to growing pigs

A new source of corn protein (NexPro) that is produced from the ethanol industry has been developed by Flint Hills Resources (Wichita, KS). NexPro contains approximately 50% crude protein and the digestibility of amino acids was reported in our November, 2020, Newsletter. However, there is at this time no information about the concentration of digestible energy (DE) and metabolizable energy (ME) in this new source of protein. Therefore, the objective of this experiment was to test the hypothesis that concentrations of DE and ME in corn protein are greater than in 2 sources of distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS; i.e., DDGS-1 and DDGS-2) when fed to growing pigs.

Publication Type: 

Espinosa, C. D., J. P. Acosta, and H. H. Stein. 2020. Growth performance not sacrificed with corn protein. National Hog Farmer, On-line edition, October, 2020.

Espinosa, C. D., J. P. Acosta, and H. H. Stein. 2020. Growth performance not sacrificed with corn protein. National Hog Farmer, On-line edition, October, 2020. Link to full text.

Authors: 

Digestibility of amino acids in a high protein corn product fed to growing pigs

Corn coproducts produced from the ethanol industry are often used in diets for pigs. A new source of corn protein (NexPro; Flint Hills Resources, Wichita, KS) has been developed, but at this time there is limited information about the nutritional value of this new source of corn protein. Therefore, the objective of this experiment was to test the hypothesis that the standardized ileal digestibility (SID) of amino acids  in corn protein is greater than in 2 sources of distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS; i.e., DDGS-1 and DDGS-2) when fed to growing pigs.

Publication Type: 

A new source of high-protein distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS) has greater digestibility of amino acids and energy, but less digestibility of phosphorus, than de-oiled DDGS when fed to growing pigs

Cristobal, Minoy, Jessica P. Acosta, Su A Lee, and Hans H. Stein. 2020. A new source of high-protein distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS) has greater digestibility of amino acids and energy, but less digestibility of phosphorus, than de-oiled DDGS when fed to growing pigs. Journal of Animal Science, 2020, Vol. 98, No. 7, 1–9. doi:10.1093/jas/skaa200.

Authors: 

Impact of increasing the levels of insoluble fiber and on the method of diet formulation measures of energy and nutrient digestibility in growing pigs

Acosta, Jesus A., Hans H. Stein, and John F. Patience. 2020. Impact of increasing the levels of insoluble fiber and on the method of diet formulation measures of energy and nutrient digestibility in growing pigs. Journal of Animal Science, 2020, 1–9. doi:10.1093/jas/skaa130. Link to full text.

Authors: 

Effect of NexPro (high-protein corn) on growth performance of weanling pigs

NexPro is a high protein feed ingredient that is generated via downstream processing of co-products from the dry-grind ethanol industry. Results from digestibility experiments indicate that NexPro contribute considerable quantities of amino acids and energy to diets fed to pigs, but there are no data demonstrating effects on growth performance of including NexPro in diets for weanling pigs. Therefore, an experiment was conducted to test the hypothesis that NexPro may replace other high-value protein sources in diets for weanling pigs without impacting pig growth performance.

Authors: 
Publication Type: 

Digestibility of amino acids in a new source of distillers dried grains with solubles fed to growing pigs

Distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS) is a co-product from the dry-grind ethanol production. However, quality and nutrient content of DDGS may differ among sources and origins and new technologies allow for production of DDGS with different chemical compositions as well as nutritional values. Recently a high-protein distillers dried grains (HP-DDG; ProCap DDGS, Marquis Energy, Hennepin, IL) was introduced and the HP-DDG has greater concentrations of CP and fat, but contains less fiber compared with conventional DDGS, which may affect the digestibility of AA in HP-DDG compared with conventional DDGS. There are, however, no data for the digestibility of AA in this new source of DDGS. Therefore, the objective of this research was to test the hypothesis that standardized ileal digestibility (SID) of AA in HP-DDG is greater than in conventional DDGS when fed to growing pigs.

Authors: 
Publication Type: