Phytase

Effects of production area and microbial phytase on the apparent and standardized total tract digestibility of phosphorus in soybean meal fed to growing pigs

Sotak-Peper, K. M., J. C. González-Vega, and H. H. Stein. 2016. Effects of production area and microbial phytase on the apparent and standardized total tract digestibility of phosphorus in soybean meal fed to growing pigs. J. Anim. Sci. 94:2397-2402. Link to full text (.pdf)

Effects of a novel phytase on growth performance and metacarpal bone ash in weanling pigs

Liu, Y., J. C. González-Vega, M. Vázquez-Añón, J. Zhao, J. Escobar, F. N. Almeida, and H. H. Stein. 2016. Effects of a novel phytase on growth performance and metacarpal bone ash in weanling pigs. J. Anim. Sci. 94(Suppl. 2):111-112 (Abstr.) Link to abstract (.pdf)

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The effect of microbial phytase on the apparent and standardized total tract digestibility of calcium in feed ingredients of animal origin

Merriman, L. A., C. L. Walk, and H. H. Stein. 2016. The effect of microbial phytase on the apparent and standardized total tract digestibility of calcium in feed ingredients of animal origin. J. Anim. Sci. 94(Suppl. 2):110 (Abstr.) Link to abstract (.pdf)

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Effects of microbial phytase on apparent and standardized total tract digestibility of calcium in feed ingredients of animal origin

Most swine diets must be supplemented with calcium because most plant ingredients commonly used in diets for pigs contain relatively little calcium. One way to add calcium is to include inorganic sources such as dicalcium phosphate or calcium carbonate; however, animal ingredients such as meat byproduct meals can also be used. These ingredients, often used as a protein source, are also a good source of calcium. To our knowledge, values for apparent (ATTD) and standardized (STTD) total tract digestibility of calcium in animal sources have not been reported. Therefore, an experiment was conducted to determine the ATTD and STTD of calcium in four calcium sources of animal origin.

The secondary objective of the study was to test the hypothesis that the addition of microbial phytase to diets containing calcium sources of animal origin would increase the digestibility of calcium. Although animal sources do not contain phytate, swine diets are composed primarily of plant ingredients, and the phytate in those ingredients might form complexes with the calcium in the animal sources.

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Effect of phytate, microbial phytase, fiber, and soybean oil on calculated values for apparent and standardized total tract digestibility of calcium and apparent total tract digestibility of phosphorus in fish meal fed to growing pigs

González-Vega, J. C., C. L. Walk, and H. H. Stein. 2015. Effect of phytate, microbial phytase, fiber, and soybean oil on calculated values for apparent and standardized total tract digestibility of calcium and apparent total tract digestibility of phosphorus in fish meal fed to growing pigs. J. Anim. Sci. 93:4808-4818. Link to full text (.pdf)

Digestibility of phosphorus in a novel source of soy protein concentrate and in soybean meal fed to weanling pigs

Soy protein concentrate is produced by extracting some of the non-protein components of soybean meal, including soluble carbohydrates, from soybean meal. These soluble carbohydrates include oligosaccharides, which reduce the tolerance of young pigs to conventional soybean meal. With the oligosaccharides removed, soy protein concentrate can be used as a source of protein in diets for weanling pigs.

Most soy protein concentrate is produced using an alcohol extraction process. However, a new source of soy protein concentrate called Nutrivance (Midwest Ag Enterprises Inc., Marshall, MN) has recently been introduced, which uses a process combining non-alcohol extraction and enzymatic treatment of soybean meal. An experiment was conducted to determine the apparent total tract digestibility (ATTD) and standardized total tract digestibility (STTD) of phosphorus in this new ingredient.

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Effects of superdosing of microbial phytase in diets for weanling pigs

Crenshaw, T. D., O. Adeola, M. J. Azain, S. K. Baidoo, S. D. Carter, G. M. Hill, S. W. Kim, P. S. Miller, M. C. Shannon, and H. H. Stein. 2015. Effects of superdosing of microbial phytase in diets for weanling pigs. J. Anim. Sci. 93(Suppl. s3):227 (Abstr.) Link to abstract (.pdf)

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Apparent and standardized total tract digestibility by growing pigs of phosphorus in canola meal from North America and 00-rapeseed meal and 00-rapeseed expellers from Europe without and with microbial phytase

Maison, T., Y. Liu, and H. H. Stein. 2015. Apparent and standardized total tract digestibility by growing pigs of phosphorus in canola meal from North America and 00-rapeseed meal and 00-rapeseed expellers from Europe without and with microbial phytase. J. Anim. Sci. 93:3494-3502. Link to full text (.pdf)

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Effects of production area and microbial phytase on the apparent and standardized total tract digestibility of phosphorus by growing pigs

The area in which soybeans are grown is known to affect various aspects of the chemical composition of soybean meal produced from those soybeans. However, it is not known if there is a difference in the concentration of phytate, and therefore in phosphorus digestibility, among soybeans from different growing areas. Therefore, an experiment was conducted to determine the concentration of phytate and the apparent (ATTD) and standardized (STTD) total tract digestibility of phosphorus in soybean meal produced from soybeans grown in four different areas in the United States. A secondary objective was to determine the effect of microbial phytase on STTD of P in soybean meal from each of the four areas.

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Effects of microbial phytase on apparent and standardized total tract digestibility of calcium in calcium supplements fed to growing pigs

González-Vega, J. C., C. L. Walk, and H. H. Stein. 2015. Effects of microbial phytase on apparent and standardized total tract digestibility of calcium in calcium supplements fed to growing pigs. J. Anim. Sci. 93:2255-2264. Link to full text (.pdf)

Effect of microbial phytase on the standardized total tract digestibility and in vitro release of phosphorus in corn, soybean meal, and rice bran fed to growing pigs

Abelilla, J. J., R. C. Sulabo, H. H. Stein, S. P. Acda, A. A. Angeles, M. C. R. Oliveros, and F. E. Merca. 2015. Effect of microbial phytase on the standardized total tract digestibility and in vitro release of phosphorus in corn, soybean meal, and rice bran fed to growing pigs. J. Anim. Sci. 93(Suppl. 2):55 (Abstr.) Link to abstract (.pdf)

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Effects of phytase on phosphorus digestibility of rice co-products fed to growing pigs

Casas, G. A. and H. H. Stein. 2015. Effects of phytase on phosphorus digestibility of rice co-products fed to growing pigs. J. Anim. Sci. 93(Suppl. 2):54-55 (Abstr.) Link to abstract (.pdf)

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Effect of diets formulated based on standardized total tract digestible phosphorus fed to growing pigs

Abelilla, J. J., R. C. Sulabo, H. H. Stein, S. P. Acda, A. A. Angeles, M. C. R. Oliveros, and F. E. Merca. 2015. Effect of diets formulated based on standardized total tract digestible phosphorus fed to growing pigs. J. Anim. Sci. 93(Suppl. 2):52-53 (Abstr.) Link to abstract (.pdf)

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Effect of a 6-phytase derived from Buttiauxella spp. expressed in Trichoderma reesei on apparent total tract digestibility of Ca and P, bone ash, and growth performance in weaning piglets

Wealleans, A. L., Y. Dersjant-Li, R. M. Bold, and H. H. Stein. 2014. Effect of a 6-phytase derived from Buttiauxella spp. expressed in Trichoderma reesei on apparent total tract digestibility of Ca and P, bone ash, and growth performance in weaning piglets. J. Anim. Sci 92(E-Suppl. 2):237 (Abstr.) Link to abstract (.pdf)

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Effect of phytase, fiber, and fat on calculated values for apparent and standardized total tract digestibility of calcium in fish meal

The presence of phytate in swine diets reduces the digestibility of calcium because phytate is able to bind calcium from organic sources and some inorganic sources, making it inaccessible to the pig. Microbial phytase breaks down phytate and increases the availability of calcium. An experiment was conducted to test the hypothesis that inclusion of microbial phytase increases the apparent (ATTD) and standardized (STTD) total tract digestibility of calcium in fish meal in diets containing phytate from corn and corn germ.

Besides phytate, corn and corn germ also add fiber and fat to diets, so it is important to know how fiber and fat affect calcium digestibility. Therefore, a second experiment was conducted to test the hypothesis that the values of ATTD and STTD of calcium obtained from cornstarch and corn based diets may differ, and to determine the effect of dietary fiber and fat on the ATTD and STTD of calcium in fish meal.

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Effects of microbial phytase on apparent and standardized total tract digestibility of calcium in calcium supplements fed to growing pigs

Calcium supplementation is important for swine diets because most commonly used feed ingredients have low concentrations of calcium. In a typical corn-soybean meal diet for a growing pig, the corn and soybean meal contribute only about 16% of the total calcium, with the rest coming from supplements. Apparent total tract digestibility (ATTD) values for calcium have not been reported for many common ingredients, and no values for the standardized total tract digestibility (STTD) of calcium have been reported. Therefore, an experiment was conducted to determine the ATTD and STTD of calcium in five calcium supplements.

An additional objective was to test the hypothesis that inclusion of microbial phytase in the diets increases the ATTD and STTD of calcium. Results of previous research has indicated that inclusion of microbial phytase in swine diets often increases the digestibility of calcium, but the effect of phytase on the STTD of calcium in individual ingredients has not been reported.

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Digestible phosphorus in canola meal, 00-rapeseed meal, and 00-rapeseed expellers without and with microbial phytase fed to nursery pigs

Maison, T. and H. H. Stein. 2014. Digestible phosphorus in canola meal, 00-rapeseed meal, and 00-rapeseed expellers without and with microbial phytase fed to nursery pigs. J. Anim. Sci. 92(Suppl. 2):141 (Abstr.) Link to abstract (.pdf)

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Effects of microbial phytase on apparent and standardized total tract digestibility of calcium in calcium supplements fed to growing pigs

González-Vega, J. C., C. L. Walk, and H. H. Stein. 2014. Effects of microbial phytase on apparent and standardized total tract digestibility of calcium in calcium supplements fed to growing pigs. J. Anim. Sci. 92(Suppl. 2):36 (Abstr.) Link to abstract (.pdf)

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Effects of phytase on amino acid and energy digestibility in corn–soybean meal diets fed to growing pigs

Almeida, F. N., A. A. Pahm, G. I. Petersen, N. R. Augspurger, and H. H. Stein. 2013. Effects of phytase on amino acid and energy digestibility in corn–soybean meal diets fed to growing pigs. Prof. Anim. Sci. 29:693-700. Link to full text (.pdf)

Effects of including microbial phytase in diets fed to pigs and broilers

Lowell, J. E., M. Song, J. K. Mathai, and H. H. Stein. 2013. Effects of including microbial phytase in diets fed to pigs and broilers. J. Anim. Sci. 91(Suppl. 2):121 (Abstr.) Link to abstract (.pdf)

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