Field peas

Influence of particle size and origin of field peas on apparent ileal digestibility of starch and amino acids and standardized ileal digestibility of amino acids when fed to growing pigs

Ibagon, Jimena A., Su A. Lee, C. Martin Nyachoti, and Hans H. Stein. 2024. Influence of particle size and origin of field peas on apparent ileal digestibility of starch and amino acids and standardized ileal digestibility of amino acids when fed to growing pigs. Translational Animal Science, 2024, 8, txae008. doi.org/10.1093/tas/txae008.

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Effects of Different Sources and Particle Sizes of Field Peas on Ileal Digestibility of Amino Acids and Starch by Growing Pigs

Ibagon, Jimena A., Su A Lee, Charles Martin Nyachoti, Hans H. Stein. 2023. Effects of Different Sources and Particle Sizes of Field Peas on Ileal Digestibility of Amino Acids and Starch by Growing Pigs. J. Anim. Sci., Volume 101, Issue Supplement 2, November 2023, Pages 187–188, doi.org/10.1093/jas/skad341.206. Link to abstract.

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Concentration of net energy in diets containing three different sources of field peas with different particle sizes fed to group-housed growing pigs

Field peas (Pisum sativum L.) are an annual season grain legume crop and are cultivated in areas that are too cold for the cultivation of soybeans. Market opportunities for field peas have increased in recent years, and the cost of cultivation is less for peas than for soybeans. The concentration of starch in field peas is less, but crude protein and amino acids are greater than in cereal grains. Therefore, in addition to providing amino acids, field peas also provide energy to swine diets, which is important because energy is the most expensive component in diets. As a consequence, it is important to determine the energy value of field peas. Agronomic practices, growing location, and differences among varieties may impact the nutritional properties of field peas, including energy digestibility. It was also observed that in-vitro energy digestibility of field peas was increased by reducing the particle size. However, there is no information on the effects of reducing particle size on concentrations of digestible energy (DE), metabolizable energy (ME), or net energy (NE) in field peas fed to group-housed pigs. Likewise, the digestibility of energy in field peas grown in the U.S. has not been compared with the digestibility of energy of field peas grown in Canada. Therefore, the objective of this research was to test the hypothesis that the particle size of field peas and the location where field peas were grown may affect the apparent total tract digestibility (ATTD) of gross energy (GE) and concentration of NE in field peas fed to growing pigs.  

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Effect of increasing microbial phytase levels on digestibility of phosphorus in field peas fed to young pigs

The majority of P in most plant feed ingredients is bound to phytate. Pigs, however, do not synthesize adequate endogenous phytate to release the P bound to phytate, which results in low digestibility of P in field peas. Values for ATTD and STTD of P in field peas without and with phytase have been reported, but there are no comparative values for the ATTD and STTD of P in field peas adding different levels of phytase. The objective of this experiment is to determine the effect of increasing levels of phytase on the apparent total tract digestibility (ATTD) and standardized total tract digestibility (STTD) of P in field peas fed to growing pigs.

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Standardized ileal digestibility of amino acids is not affected by reducing particle sizes or different origins of field peas fed to growing pigs

Field peas (Pisum sativum L.) have been cultivated for centuries for human consumption, due to the high nutritional quality of pea protein. However, during the last years, increasing demand for field peas for livestock feeding has developed a market in Canada, Europe, and the U.S. Therefore, as is the case with some feed ingredients, differences in soil, varieties, agronomic practices, and growing method may change the nutritional characteristics of the peas as well as the digestibility of nutrients. Besides that, differences in the particle size of field peas may change the digestibility of nutrients. Therefore, the objective of this experiment was to test the hypothesis that the standardized ileal digestibility (SID) of crude protein (CP) and amino acids (AA) in field peas is affected by the particle size of the field peas and the region where the field peas were grown.

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Standardized total tract digestibility of phosphorus in three different sources of field peas (Pisum sativum L.) with different particle sizes fed to weanling pigs

Field peas have been produced mainly for human consumption, but lastly, the industry has been included in diets fed to livestock due to its content of starch and protein. In diets for swine, only peas that are harvested at maturity are used. Almost 80% of P in non-oilseed legumes is bound to phytate, and pigs do not synthesize an adequate amount of endogenous phytate to liberate the P bound to phytate. Therefore, the digestibility of P in field peas is relatively low. Values for apparent total tract digestibility (ATTD) and standardized total tract digestibility (STTD) of P in field peas have been reported, but there are no comparative values for the ATTD and STTD of P among different varieties of field peas at different particle sizes. Therefore, the objective of this experiment was to test the hypothesis that there are no differences in the ATTD and the STTD of P among different sources of field peas fed to young pigs and the second hypothesis was that there is a linear increase in the ATTD and STTD of P as the particle size of field peas increases.

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Digestibility of starch, crude protein and amino acids in three sources of field peas ground at two different particle sizes fed to growing pigs

Market opportunities for field peas (Pisum sativum L.) have rapidly increased for livestock feed and human food, due of the high nutritional quality of pea protein. However, as is the case with some feed ingredients, differences in soil, varieties, agronomic practices and growing method may change the nutritional characteristics of the peas as well as digestibility of nutrients. In addition, it is possible that differences in the particle size of field peas change the digestibility of energy and nutrients as has been reported for other ingredients. However, information about the effects of particle size of peas on digestibility of starch and amino acids (AA) are limited. Additionally, there is limited research to compare the digestibility of AA among field peas produced in different regions of the U.S. and Canada. Therefore, the objective of this experiment was to test the hypothesis that the apparent ileal digestibility (AID) of crude protein and starch, and the standardized ileal digestibility (SID) of AA in field peas may be affected by the particle size of the field peas and the region where the field peas were grown.

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Amino acid digestibility in field peas, fish meal, corn, soybean meal, and soybean hulls

Mathai, J. K. and H. H. Stein. 2014. Amino acid digestibility in field peas, fish meal, corn, soybean meal, and soybean hulls. J. Anim. Sci 92(E-Suppl. 2):648 (Abstr.) Link to abstract (.pdf)

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Coefficient of standardized ileal digestibility of amino acids in corn, soybean meal, corn gluten meal, high-protein distillers dried grains, and field peas fed to weanling pigs (Short communication)

Petersen, G. I., Y. Liu, and H. H. Stein. 2014. Coefficient of standardized ileal digestibility of amino acids in corn, soybean meal, corn gluten meal, high-protein distillers dried grains, and field peas fed to weanling pigs (Short communication). Anim. Feed Sci. Technol. 188:145-149. Link to full text (.pdf)

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Effects of replacing soybean meal with pea chips and distillers dried grains with solubles in diets fed to growing-finishing pigs on growth performance, carcass quality, and pork palatability

Harris, E. K., E. P. Berg, T. C. Gilbery, A. N. Lepper, H. H. Stein, and D. J. Newman. 2012. Effects of replacing soybean meal with pea chips and distillers dried grains with solubles in diets fed to growing-finishing pigs on growth performance, carcass quality, and pork palatability. Prof. Anim. Sci. 28:1-10. Link to full text (.pdf)

Effects of pea chips on pig performance, carcass quality and composition, and palatability of pork

Newman, D. J., E. K. Harris, A. N. Lepper, E. P. Berg, and H. H. Stein. 2011. Effects of pea chips on pig performance, carcass quality and composition, and palatability of pork. J. Anim. Sci. 89:3132-3139. Link to full text (.pdf)

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Materias primas alternativas en nutrición porcina: 1. Guisantes de campo

Stein, H. H. 2010. Materias primas alternativas en nutrición porcina: 1. Guisantes de campo. Pages 32-40 in Suis, November 2010. Link to full text (.pdf)

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Energy and nutrient concentration and digestibility in alternative feed ingredients and recommended inclusion rates

Stein, H. H. 2011. Energy and nutrient concentration and digestibility in alternative feed ingredients and recommended inclusion rates. In Proceedings of the American Association of Swine Veterinarians 42nd Annual Meeting. Phoenix, AZ. Link to full text (.pdf)

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Effects of including raw or extruded field peas (Pisum sativum L.) in diets fed to weanling pigs

Stein, H. H., D. N. Peters, and B. G. Kim. 2010. Effects of including raw or extruded field peas (Pisum sativum L.) in diets fed to weanling pigs. J. Sci. Food Agric. 90:1429-1436. Link to full text (.pdf)

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Effects of including field peas in diets fed to weanling pigs

Stein, H. H., and D. N. Peters. 2008. Effects of including field peas in diets fed to weanling pigs. J. Anim. Sci. 86(E-Suppl. 2):448 (Abstr.) Link to abstract (.pdf)

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Digestibility of phosphorus in field peas by growing pigs

Geraets, L. L., M. G. Boersma, and H. H. Stein. 2006. Digestibility of phosphorus in field peas by growing pigs. J. Anim. Sci. 84 (Suppl. 2):116 (Abstr.) Link to abstract (.pdf)

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Feeding field peas to market pigs had minimal effects on carcass composition, meat quality or cooked pork palatability

Everts, A., H. H. Stein, D. Peters, C. Pedersen, K. Sweeter, D. Wulf, and R. Maddock. 2005. Feeding field peas to market pigs had minimal effects on carcass composition, meat quality or cooked pork palatability. Pages 12-13 in Proc. 51st Intl. Cong. Meat Sci. Technol., Baltimore, Maryland, USA, August 7-12, 2005 (Abstr.) Link to abstract (.pdf)

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Assessment of the feeding value of South Dakota grown field peas for growing pigs

Stein, H. H., R. A. Bohlke, V. Rayadurg, D. Peters, and R. C. Thaler. 2002. Assessment of the feeding value of South Dakota grown field peas for growing pigs. J. Anim. Sci. 80(Suppl. 2):63 (Abstr.) Link to abstract (.pdf)

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Alternative grain sources in diets fed to pigs

Stein, H. H. 2009. Alternative grain sources in diets fed to pigs. Pages 163-179 in Proc. Retos Y Elternativas Para La Production Animal Tropical. Ensminger School, February 11-13, 2009, San Jose, Costa Rica. Link to full text (.pdf)

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