LeeSA

Effect of decreasing protein levels in diets fed to weanling pigs on growth performance, fecal score, and carcass characteristics

Diarrhea is one of the main problems for pigs during the post-weaning period. Traditionally, antibiotic growth promoters have been used to control post-weaning diarrhea, but consumers are increasingly concerned about this practice and there is therefore an interest in feeding diets that contain no antibiotics. However, feeding pigs without antibiotic growth promoters requires alternative strategies to control post-weaning diarrhea, but feeding low protein diets may be one way to reduce the incidence of post-weaning diarrhea. However, there is a lack of knowledge about consequences of reducing the protein level in diets fed to weanling pigs.

Feeding low protein diets to pigs results in increased net energy in the diet, reduced water intake by pigs, and reduced nitrogen excretion. This will result in reduced volume of manure and also reduced concentrations of ammonium in manure. However, if formulation of low protein diets results in feeding diets with concentrations of indispensable AA that are below the requirements, deposition of protein in pigs may be greater and deposition of fat may be increased compared with pigs fed a diet containing higher level of protein. However, it is not known if feeding a diet low in protein to weanling pigs also results in changes in carcass characteristics of market pigs.

Therefore, the objective of this experiment was to test the hypothesis that feeding a low-protein diet to pigs during the post-weaning period will result in reduced diarrhea during this period, but no effects on growth performance from wean to finish and no changes in carcass composition of pigs when they reach market weight.

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Basal endogenous loss, standardized total tract digestibility, and retention of calcium in gestating sows changes during gestation, but microbial phytase reduces basal endogenous loss of calcium by gestating sows

Standardized total tract digestibility (STTD) of Ca has been determined for most Ca containing ingredients fed to growing pigs, but the basal endogenous loss of Ca is greater and the STTD of Ca in sows in mid-gestation are less than in growing pigs. As a consequence, if diets for gestating sows are formulated using STTD values determined in growing pigs, the provisions of digestible Ca may be less than anticipated.

The efficacy of phytase to release Ca and P is believed to be influenced by the physiological state of pigs with phytase fed to sows in mid-gestation releasing less Ca and P compared with growing pigs or sows in late-gestation. However, it is not known if values for STTD of Ca or retention of Ca and P that are measured in one period of gestation are representative of the entire gestation period.

Therefore, an experiment was conducted to test the hypothesis that the STTD of Ca from calcium carbonate and the response to microbial phytase on STTD of Ca and apparent total tract digestibility (ATTD) of P in corn-based diets fed to gestating sows are constant throughout the gestating period for sows. The second objective was to test the hypothesis that retention of Ca and P does not change during gestation.

 

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Comparative digestibility and retention rate of calcium and phosphorus in low- and high-phytate diets fed to gestating sows and growing pigs

Digestibility of Ca and P is most correctly determined as standardized total tract digestibility (STTD). Data for the STTD of P in most feed ingredients have been published, and the STTD of Ca has also been determined in many feed ingredients. However, in practical diet formulation, values for STTD of Ca and P obtained in growing pigs are also applied to sows although there is a lack of comparative data between growing pigs and sows.

Therefore, an experiment was conducted to test the hypothesis that no differences exist between gestating sows and growing pigs for basal endogenous losses, STTD, and retention of Ca and P.

 

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The level of feed intake does not influence digestibility of calcium and phosphorus in diets fed to gestating sows, but gestating sows have reduced digestibility of calcium and phosphorus compared with growing gilts

Lee, S. A., G. A. Casas, and H. H. Stein. 2018. The level of feed intake does not influence digestibility of calcium and phosphorus in diets fed to gestating sows, but gestating sows have reduced digestibility of calcium and phosphorus compared with growing gilts. Can. J. Anim. Sci. 98:591-594. Link to abstract

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Non-antibiotic feed additives in diets for pigs: A review

Yanhong Liu, Charmaine D. Espinosa, Jerubella J. Abelilla, Gloria A. Casas, L. Vanessa Lagos, Su A. Lee, Woong B. Kwon, John K. Mathai, Diego M.D.L. Navarro, Neil W. Jaworski, Hans H. Stein. 2018. Non-antibiotic feed additives in diets for pigs: A review. Anim. Nutr. 4:113-125. Link to full text (.pdf)

Digestibility of amino acids, fiber, and fat and concentrations of digestible and metabolizable energy in two sources of distillers dried grains with solubles fed to growing pigs

Rodriguez, D. A., S. A. Lee, and H. H. Stein. 2018. Digestibility of amino acids, fiber, and fat and concentrations of digestible and metabolizable energy in two sources of distillers dried grains with solubles fed to growing pigs. J. Anim. Sci. 96(Suppl. 2):173-174 (Abstr.) Link to abstract (.pdf)

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Digestibility of amino acids, energy, fat, and fiber and digestible and metabolizable energy in low-oil distillers dried grains with solubles fed to growing pigs

Lee, S. A., C. D. Espinosa, and H. H. Stein. 2018. Digestibility of amino acids, energy, fat, and fiber and digestible and metabolizable energy in low-oil distillers dried grains with solubles fed to growing pigs. J. Anim. Sci. 96(Suppl. 2):172-173 (Abstr.) Link to abstract (.pdf)

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Effects of Dakota Gold and conventional distillers dried grains with solubles on wean to finish growth performance and carcass characteristics of pigs fed diets provided as pellets or in a meal form

Rodriguez, D. A., S. A. Lee, and H. H. Stein. 2018. Effects of Dakota Gold and conventional distillers dried grains with solubles on wean to finish growth performance and carcass characteristics of pigs fed diets provided as pellets or in a meal form. J. Anim. Sci. 96(Suppl. 2):141-142 (Abstr.) Link to abstract (.pdf)

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Comparative digestibility and retention of calcium and phosphorus by gestating sows and growing pigs fed low- and high-phytate diets without or with microbial phytase

Lee, S. A., C. L. Walk, and H. H. Stein. 2018. Comparative digestibility and retention of calcium and phosphorus by gestating sows and growing pigs fed low- and high-phytate diets without or with microbial phytase. J. Anim. Sci. 96(Suppl. 2):83 (Abstr.) Link to abstract (.pdf)

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Effects of Calmin on energy, calcium, phosphorus, and nitrogen balance and on growth performance of weanling pigs

Calmin is a calcium supplement produced from sea minerals. It also contains 6% magnesium, which may increase calcium absorption. Calmin has been used as a rumen buffer in dairy cows, but limited data are available for pigs. Therefore, two experiments were conducted to test the effect of feeding diets containing Calmin on calcium, phosphorus, and nitrogen balance, energy balance, and growth performance of weanling pigs.

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Effects of Dakota Gold distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS) and conventional DDGS on growth performance and carcass quality of pigs fed diets as meal or as pellets

Dakota Gold is a low-oil source of distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS) produced using a cold-fermentation process. Recent research conducted by the Stein Monogastric Nutrition Laboratory has demonstrated that the standardized ileal digestibility (SID) of amino acids is greater in Dakota Gold than in conventional DDGS, but Dakota Gold contains less metabolizable energy (ME) than conventional DDGS.

An experiment was conducted to determine effects on growth performance and carcass characteristics of feeding Dakota Gold or conventional DDGS to pigs from weaning to market. Because limited information exists about effects of pelleting on growth performance of pigs fed diets that contain DDGS, this research also tested the effects of feeding diets containing either Dakota Gold or conventional DDGS in a meal form or in a pelleted form.

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Digestibility of crude protein and amino acids in Dakota Gold distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS) fed to pigs is greater than in conventional DDGS

Distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS) is a co-product of ethanol production. In recent years, companies that produce DDGS have begun to remove some of the corn oil for use in biodiesel production. Conventional DDGS contains 10-12% fat, compared with 6-9% in low-oil DDGS.

Research has shown that adding fat to diets fed to pigs increases the digestibility of amino acids in the diets. However, there is limited information about how reduced oil concentration in DDGS influences the digestibility of protein when fed to pigs. An experiment was conducted to compare the standardized ileal digestibility (SID) of crude protein and amino acids in conventional DDGS and in the low-oil DDGS product Dakota Gold, which is produced using a process that does not involve heating.

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Digestibility of energy and nutrients, and concentrations of DE and ME, in Dakota Gold DDGS fed to pigs

In recent years, companies that produce distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS) have begun to remove some of the corn oil for use in biodiesel production. Conventional DDGS contains 10-12% fat, compared with 6-9% in low-oil DDGS.

There is limited information about how oil concentration in DDGS influences the digestibility of energy, fiber, and fat when fed to pigs. Therefore, an experiment was conducted to determine the apparent total tract digestibility (ATTD) of energy, neutral detergent fiber (NDF), acid detergent fiber (ADF), and acid hydrolyzed ether extract (AEE), as well as the concentrations of digestible energy (DE) and metabolizable energy (ME) in two sources of DDGS. One source was a conventional DDGS, and the other was Dakota Gold, a low-oil DDGS.

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Two days of adaptation period may be enough for measuring ileal amino acid digestibility using chromium or titanium as an indigestible index in swine diets

Kim, B. G., S. A. Lee, and H. H. Stein. 2017. Two days of adaptation period may be enough for measuring ileal amino acid digestibility using chromium or titanium as an indigestible index in swine diets. J. Anim. Sci. 95(Suppl. 4):44 (Abstr.) Link to abstract (.pdf)

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Digestibility of NDF and concentration of DE and ME in low-oil DDGS fed to growing pigs

In recent years, ethanol plants have begun extracting more oil from the solubles left over after fermentation. The resulting low oil distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS) contain less digestible energy (DE) and metabolizable energy (ME) than traditional DDGS.

The fat content of the diet affects the digestibility of energy and nutrients. Because the production of low oil DDGS is a relatively new development, it has not been established that digestibility values are the same across suppliers. Therefore, an experiment was conducted to measure the apparent total tract digestibility (ATTD) of neutral detergent fiber (NDF) and the concentration of DE and ME among DDGS samples from different suppliers.

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Non-antibiotic feed additives in diets for pigs

Liu, Y., D. Espinosa, J. J. Abelilla, G. A. Casas, L. V. Lagos, S. A. Lee, W. B. Kwon, J. K. Mathai, D. M.D. L. Navarro, N. W. Jaworski, and H. H. Stein. 2016. Non-antibiotic feed additives in diets for pigs. Pages 263-281 in Proceedings of the 2016 Chinese Swine Industry Symposium, Shanghai, China, October 20-21, 2016. Link to full text (.pdf)

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