Mallea

Supplementation of Valine, Isoleucine, and Tryptophan may overcome the negative effects of dietary excess Leucine in corn protein when fed to weanling pigs. 

Mallea, Andrea P., and Hans H. Stein. 2023. Supplementation of Valine, Isoleucine, and Tryptophan may overcome the negative effects of dietary excess Leucine in corn protein when fed to weanling pigs. XXXVIII Curso de especializacion FEDNA. Pag 329. Link to abstract.

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Supplementation of Valine, Isoleucine, and Tryptophan may overcome the negative effects of dietary excess Leucine in corn protein when fed to weanling pigs

High protein corn protein (HPCP) is a corn co-product derived from the ethanol industry that contains between 40 and 50% crude protein, and therefore, may be used in diets for pigs as a source of amino acids (AA). However, such diets will contain more than twice as much Leu as recommended and there is a negative relationship between dietary Leu and brain synthesis of serotonin, which results in reduced feed intake of pigs fed diets containing excess Leu. There is also a reduced protein synthesis because of increased Val and Ile metabolism due to excess dietary Leu. As a consequence, pigs often have reduced growth performance if fed diets with high concentrations of HPCP. However, it may be possible to counteract the negative effects of the high Leu concentrations in corn co-products by adding crystalline sources of Trp, Val, and Ile to the diets and it may, therefore, be possible that HPCP can be used in diets without influencing growth performance or intestinal health of weanling pigs. Therefore, the hypothesis that HPCP may be used as the primary source of AA in diets for weanling pigs if diets are fortified with crystalline AA was tested. 

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Nutritional value of a new source of cheese coproduct fed to weanling pigs

Mallea, Andrea P., Maryane S. F. Oliveira, Diego A. Lopez, and Hans H. Stein. 2023. Nutritional value of a new source of cheese coproduct fed to weanling pigs. Journal of Animal Science: 101, 1–10. doi.org/10.1093/jas/skad107. Link to full text.

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Nutritional Value of a New Source of Cheese Co-Product Fed to Weanling Pigs

Mallea O., A. P., M. S. F. S. Oliveira, D. A. Lopez D., H. H. Stein. 2022. Nutritional Value of a New Source of Cheese Co-Product Fed to Weanling Pigs. J. Anim. Sci. 100(Suppl. 2): 174. doi.org/10.1093/jas/skac064.296. Link to Abstr.

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Cheese Co-Product Offers High Nutritional Value for Weanling Pigs

Mallea, A. P., and H. H. Stein. 2021. Cheese Co-Product Offers High Nutritional Value for Weanling Pigs. Pork Magazine, On-line edition, Aug. 12, 2021. Link to full text.

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Digestibility of energy and concentrations of digestible and metabolizable energy in a cheese co-product, fish meal, and enzyme treated soybean meal fed to weanling pigs

Dried whey is often used as a source of lactose in diets for weanling pigs. Whey is a co-product from dairy processing plants that is generated after fat and protein in milk has been used to produce cheese. Whey powder is therefore, low in protein because the majority of the milk protein ends up in the cheese during processing. However, some of the cheese that is produced may not be suitable for human consumption, but can instead be used as a feed ingredient for pigs after being blended with other ingredients to improve flowability and handling.  One of the cheese co-products that is currently being marketed contains 40 to 50% crude protein and has a high digestibility of amino acids. There is, however, limited information about the energy value of cheese co-products fed to pigs although it is expected that because of the high concentration of fat in cheese, the energy value will also be high. Therefore, it was the objective of this experiment to test the hypothesis that digestibility of energy and concentrations of digestible energy (DE) and metabolizable energy (ME) in a cheese co-product is greater than that in fish meal and enzyme treated soybean meal when fed to weanling pigs.

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