Amino acid digestibility

Nutritional value of dried fermentation biomass, hydrolyzed porcine intestinal mucosa products, and fish meal fed to weanling pigs

Sulabo, R. C., J. K. Mathai, J. L. Usry, B. W. Ratliff, D. M. McKilligan, J. D. Moline, G. Xu, and H. H. Stein. 2013. Nutritional value of dried fermentation biomass, hydrolyzed porcine intestinal mucosa products, and fish meal fed to weanling pigs. J. Anim. Sci. 91:2802-2811. Link to full text (.pdf)

Effects of heat treatment on the composition and amino acid digestibility of canola meal fed to growing pigs

Canola meal is the second most used plant protein source, after soybean meal, in livestock diets. The production of canola meal involves a step in which the meal is treated with steam for 35 to 50 minutes at temperatures from 95 to 115°C. The application of heat and moisture to feedstuffs results in the Maillard reaction, which reduces the concentration and digestibility of amino acids. Lysine is particularly susceptible to the Maillard reaction, so it is important to determine accurate digestible lysine levels in feedstuffs that may be heat damaged. Amino acid analysis that does not account for lysine recovered from acid hydrolysis of Maillard products may overestimate the amount of digestible lysine in a sample. Therefore, methods other than simple lysine analysis must be used when assessing feed that may be heat damaged.

An experiment was conducted to determine the effects of heat damage on the digestibility of crude protein and amino acids in canola meal fed to growing pigs. Another objective of the experiment was to develop regression equations to predict the concentration of standardized ileal digestible (SID) amino acids in canola meal.

Authors: 
Publication Type: 

Comparative amino acid digestibility in US blood products fed to weanling pigs

Almeida, F. N., J. K. Htoo, J. Thomson, and H. H. Stein. 2013. Comparative amino acid digestibility in US blood products fed to weanling pigs. Anim. Feed Sci. Technol. 181:80-86. Link to full text (.pdf)

Amino acid digestibility in heat damaged distillers dried grains with solubles fed to pigs

Almeida, F. N., J. K. Htoo, J. Thomson, and H. H. Stein. 2013. Amino acid digestibility in heat damaged distillers dried grains with solubles fed to pigs. J. Anim. Sci. 91(Suppl. 2):110 (Abstr.) Link to abstract (.pdf)

Publication Type: 

Amino acid digestibility by growing pigs in distillers dried grains with solubles with conventional, medium, or low concentrations of fat

Curry, S., Navarro, D., Almeida, F., and H. Stein. 2013. Amino acid digestibility by growing pigs in distillers dried grains with solubles with conventional, medium, or low concentrations of fat. J. Anim. Sci. 91(Suppl. 2):102-103 (Abstr.) Link to abstract (.pdf)

Publication Type: 

Effects of heat damage on the nutritional composition and on the amino acid digestibility of canola meal, sunflower meal, and cottonseed meal fed to pigs

Almeida, F. N., J. K. Htoo, J. Thomson, and H. H. Stein. 2013. Effects of heat damage on the nutritional composition and on the amino acid digestibility of canola meal, sunflower meal, and cottonseed meal fed to pigs. J. Anim. Sci. 91(Suppl. 2):27 (Abstr.) Link to abstract (.pdf)

Publication Type: 

Amino acid digestibility in canola meal, 00-rapeseed meal, and 00-rapeseed expellers fed to growing pigs

Maison, T. and H. H. Stein. 2013. Amino acid digestibility in canola meal, 00-rapeseed meal, and 00-rapeseed expellers fed to growing pigs. J. Anim. Sci. 91(Suppl. 2):27 (Abstr.) Link to abstract (.pdf)

Authors: 
Publication Type: 

Concentration of metabolizable energy and digestibility of amino acids in chicken meal, poultry by-product meal, Ultrapro, AV-E Digest, and conventional soybean meal fed to pigs

Rojas, O. J. and H. H. Stein. 2013. Concentration of metabolizable energy and digestibility of amino acids in chicken meal, poultry by-product meal, Ultrapro, AV-E Digest, and conventional soybean meal fed to pigs. J. Anim. Sci. 91(Suppl. 2):26 (Abstr.) Link to abstract (.pdf)

Authors: 
Publication Type: 

Energy concentration and amino acid digestibility in corn and corn co-products fed to growing pigs

Song, M., J. K. Mathai, F. N. Almeida, O. J. Rojas, S. L. Tilton, M. J. Cecava, and H. H. Stein. 2013. Energy concentration and amino acid digestibility in corn and corn co-products fed to growing pigs. J. Anim. Sci. 91(Suppl. 2):23-24 (Abstr.) Link to abstract (.pdf)

Publication Type: 

Amino acid digestibility and concentration of digestible and metabolizable energy in copra meal, palm kernel expellers, and palm kernel meal fed to growing pigs

Sulabo, R. C., Ju, W. S., and H. H. Stein. 2013. Amino acid digestibility and concentration of digestible and metabolizable energy in copra meal, palm kernel expellers, and palm kernel meal fed to growing pigs. J. Anim. Sci. 91:1391-1399. Link to full text (.pdf)

Authors: 

Bioavailability of amino acids, lipids, and carbohydrates in feedstuffs

Kil, D. Y., S. K. Cervantes-Pahm, and H. H. Stein. 2013. Bioavailability of amino acids, lipids, and carbohydrates in feedstuffs. Pages 317-339 in Sustainable Swine Nutrition. Chiba, L. I., ed. John Wiley & Sons Inc., Ames, IA. Link to full text (.pdf)

Publication Type: 

Effects of thermal processing on the nutritional value of feed ingredients

Almeida, F. N., O. J. Rojas, and H. H. Stein. 2012. Effects of thermal processing on the nutritional value of feed ingredients. Pages 269-274 in XXVIII Curso de Especialización: Avances en nutrición y alimentación animal, Madrid, Nov. 7-8, 2012. Link to full text (.pdf)

Authors: 
Publication Type: 

Effect on amino acid digestibility of reducing the particle size of corn fed to growing pigs

Research has shown that grinding cereal grains in diets fed to pigs into smaller particle sizes improves growth performance. Feed ground to smaller particle sizes has more surface area on which digestive enzymes can work, so digestibility of energy and nutrients that are enzymatically digested may also be improved. Previous research at the University of Illinois indicated that particle size had no effect on the digestibility of phosphorus, but that decreasing particle size increased energy digestibility in corn in the range of 338.5 μm to 864.5 μm.

However, it is not known if reduced particle size also increases amino acid digestibility. Therefore, an experiment was conducted to determine the standardized ileal digestibility (SID) of amino acids in corn that was ground to different particle sizes and fed to growing pigs.

Authors: 
Publication Type: 

Aspects of amino acid digestibility in feed ingredients fed to pigs

Almeida, F. N., and H. H. Stein. 2012. Aspects of amino acid digestibility in feed ingredients fed to pigs. Pages 253-266 in Recent Advances in Animal Nutrition. Garnsworthy, P. C. and J. Wiseman, eds. Nottingham University Press, Nottingham, UK. Link to full text (.pdf)

Authors: 
Publication Type: 

Amino acid digestibility of alternative animal protein sources fed to weanling pigs

Animal protein sources such as fish meal and protein plasma are often used in diets fed to weanling pigs because the amino acids in these sources are highly digestible and because animal protein sources do not contain the anti-nutritional factors present in soybean meal. However, the cost of fish meal has increased in recent years and there is, therefore, a need for less expensive alternatives.

Chicken meal and and poultry by-product meal are protein ingredients that have a concentration of amino acids similar to that of fish meal. Poultry by-product meal is produced from the offal of carcasses of slaughtered poultry and includes feet, necks, undeveloped eggs, and intestines. Chicken meal is prepared from clean flesh and skin of chickens without or with bone derived from the whole carcass of poultry. The quality of chicken meal and poultry by-product meal depends on the quality of the rendered parts to produce them. Ultrapro is produced from enzymatically hydrolyzed porcine intestines, and AV-E Digest is produced by enzymatically hydrolyzing whole spent hens and extruded egg albumins. Insufficient data exist on the digestibility of crude protein and amino acids in these ingredients.  Therefore, an experiment was conducted to determine the digestibility of crude protein and amino acids in chicken meal, poultry by-product meal, Ultrapro, and AV-E Digest when fed to weanling pigs and to compare these values with values obtained for soybean meal.

Authors: 
Publication Type: 

Amino acid digestibility in canola, cottonseed, and sunflower products fed to finishing pigs

González-Vega, J. C. and H. H. Stein. 2012. Amino acid digestibility in canola, cottonseed, and sunflower products fed to finishing pigs. J. Anim. Sci. 90:4391:4400. Link to full text (.pdf)

The nutritional quality of feed ingredients

Stein, H. H. 2012. The nutritional quality of feed ingredients. Pages 69-77 in Proceedings of the Chinese Swine Industry Symposium, Shanghai, October 24-26, 2012. Link to full text (.pdf)

Authors: 
Publication Type: 

Aspects of amino acid digestibility in feed ingredients fed to pigs

Almeida, F. N. and H. H. Stein. 2012. Aspects of amino acid digestibility in feed ingredients fed to pigs. Pages 33-34 in Abstracts of the 44th University of Nottingham Feed Conference, Nottingham, UK, June 27-28, 2012 (Abstr.) Link to abstract (.pdf)

Authors: 
Publication Type: 

Amino acid digestibility in hydrolyzed feather meal fed to pigs

Almeida, F. N., L. I. Chiba, S. D. Brotzge, R. L. Payne, and H. H. Stein. 2012. Amino acid digestibility in hydrolyzed feather meal fed to pigs. J. Anim. Sci. 90(E-Suppl. 3):469 (Abstr.) Link to abstract (.pdf)

Publication Type: 

Amino acid digestibility in blood products fed to weanling pigs

Almeida, F. N., J. K. Htoo, J. Thomson, and H. H. Stein. 2012. Amino acid digestibility in blood products fed to weanling pigs. J. Anim. Sci. 90(E-Suppl. 3):468-469 (Abstr.) Link to abstract (.pdf)

Publication Type: 

Pages