Growth performance

Effects of dietary leucine and tryptophan supplementations on serotonin metabolism and growth performance of growing pigs.

Kwon, W. B., K. J. Touchette, A. Simongiovanni, K. Syriopoulos, A. Wessels, and H. H. Stein. 2019. Effects of dietary leucine and tryptophan supplementations on serotonin metabolism and growth performance of growing pigs. In: 6th EAAP International Symposium on Energy and Protein Metabolism and Nutrition, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil, Sep. 9-12, 2019. Pages 303-304.

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Effects of copper hydroxychloride on growth performance and abundance of genes involved in lipid metabolism of growing pigs

Supplementing Cu to diets fed to pigs at 100 to 250 mg/kg may reduce post-weaning scouring and also improve ADG and ADFI. Addition of Cu at 250 mg/kg in diets for pigs containing 5% animal fat improved growth performance, and it was speculated that this is due to the ability of Cu to improve animal fat utilization and enzymatic activity. Inclusion of 45 mg/kg of dietary Cu in diets for rabbits improved body mass gain by upregulating mRNA transcription of fatty acid transport protein, fatty acid binding protein, and carnitine palmitoyl transferase 1, indicating that dietary Cu may influence post-absorptive metabolism of lipids. However, the effect of supplementing dietary Cu on post-absorptive lipid metabolism in pigs remains inconclusive. Therefore, an experiment was conducted to test the hypothesis that addition of 150 mg/kg Cu from Cu hydroxychloride (IntelliBond CII; Micronutrients USA LLC; Indianapolis, IN) to a diet based on corn, soybean meal (SBM), and distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS) improves growth performance of pigs, and that dietary Cu influences mRNA abundance of genes involved in post-absorptive metabolism of lipids in pigs.

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Effects of copper hydroxychloride and increasing concentrations of dietary fat on growth performance, total tract endogenous loss of fat, and apparent total tract digestibility of fat by growing pigs

Charmaine D. Espinosa, Robert Scott Fry, Matthew Kocher, Hans H. Stein. 2019. Effects of copper hydroxychloride and increasing concentrations of dietary fat on growth performance, total tract endogenous loss of fat, and apparent total tract digestibility of fat by growing pigs. Journal of Animal Science, Volume 97, Issue Supplement_2, July 2019, Page 68. (Abstr.). Link to abstract.

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Effects of dietary leucine concentration on branched-chain amino acid metabolism in growing pigs

Kwon Woong B., Kevin J. Touchette, Aude Simongiovanni, Kostas Syriopoulos, Anna Wessels, Hans H. Stein. 2019. Effects of dietary leucine concentration on branched-chain amino acid metabolism in growing pigs. Journal of Animal Science, Volume 97, Issue Supplement_2, July 2019, Pages 65–66. (Abstr.). Link to abstract.

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Effect of inclusion of an enhanced torula yeast on growth performance, fecal score, and blood characteristics of weanling pigs

Digestibility experiments have been conducted to determine the nutritional value of an enhanced torula yeast derived from forestry by-products. Results of these experiments indicated that enhanced torula yeast has a greater digestibility of amino acids and P than fish meal, and a concentration of metabolizable energy that is not different from that in fish meal. Therefore, it is believed that the enhanced torula yeast can be included in diets for weanling pigs at the expense of fish meal and other animal protein sources. Therefore, the objective of this experiment was to determine the effects on growth performance, fecal score, and blood characteristics of including the enhanced torula yeast at the expense of fish meal and plasma protein in diets fed to weanling pigs.

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Excess leucine reduces nitrogen retention, growth performance in pigs.

Kwon, W. B., and H. H. Stein. 2019. Excess leucine reduces nitrogen retention, growth performance in pigs. July 29, 2019. Link to ful text.

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Effects of distillers dried grains with solubles on amino acid digestibility, growth performance, and carcass characteristics of growing pigs

Curry Shelby M., Laia Blavi, Julian Wiseman, and Hans H. Stein. 2019. Effects of distillers dried grains with solubles on amino acid digestibility, growth performance, and carcass characteristics of growing pigs. Transl. Anim. Sci. 2019.3:641–653. Link to full text

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Effects of Fermex 200 (fermented soybean meal) on growth performance and amino acid digestibility by weanling pigs

Soybean meal (SBM) is one of the most important protein sources in swine diets. However, SBM has high concentrations of non-digestible oligosaccharides, mainly stachyose, raffinose, and verbascose, which may increase diarrhea incidence and reduce nursery growth performance. Fermex 200 (Purina Animal Nutrition, Shoreview, MN, USA) is a new source of fermented SBM that may serve as an alternative to other protein sources in diets fed to pigs. However, there are at this point no data for effects of Fermex 200 on growth performance and amino acid (AA) digestibility when fed to weanling pigs.

Therefore, 2 experiments were conducted to test the hypothesis that the apparent ileal digestibility (AID) and standardized ileal digestibility (SID) of AA in Fermex 200 are greater than in conventional SBM. The second hypothesis was that Fermex 200 supports growth of weanling pigs as well as other protein sources.

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Effect of copper hydroxychloride and heat stress on growth performance, diarrhea incidence, and blood characteristics of weanling pigs

Espinosa, C., S. Fry, M. Kocher, and H. Stein. 2018. Effect of copper hydroxychloride and heat stress on growth performance, diarrhea incidence, and blood characteristics of weanling pigs. 14th International Symposium on Digestive Physiology of Pigs. Adv. Anim. Biosci. Volume 9, Issue S2, 9:S94-95. (Abstr.). Link to abstract

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Effect of decreasing protein levels in diets fed to weanling pigs on growth performance, fecal score, and carcass characteristics

Diarrhea is one of the main problems for pigs during the post-weaning period. Traditionally, antibiotic growth promoters have been used to control post-weaning diarrhea, but consumers are increasingly concerned about this practice and there is therefore an interest in feeding diets that contain no antibiotics. However, feeding pigs without antibiotic growth promoters requires alternative strategies to control post-weaning diarrhea, but feeding low protein diets may be one way to reduce the incidence of post-weaning diarrhea. However, there is a lack of knowledge about consequences of reducing the protein level in diets fed to weanling pigs.

Feeding low protein diets to pigs results in increased net energy in the diet, reduced water intake by pigs, and reduced nitrogen excretion. This will result in reduced volume of manure and also reduced concentrations of ammonium in manure. However, if formulation of low protein diets results in feeding diets with concentrations of indispensable AA that are below the requirements, deposition of protein in pigs may be greater and deposition of fat may be increased compared with pigs fed a diet containing higher level of protein. However, it is not known if feeding a diet low in protein to weanling pigs also results in changes in carcass characteristics of market pigs.

Therefore, the objective of this experiment was to test the hypothesis that feeding a low-protein diet to pigs during the post-weaning period will result in reduced diarrhea during this period, but no effects on growth performance from wean to finish and no changes in carcass composition of pigs when they reach market weight.

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Effects of dietary digestible calcium on growth performance and bone ash concentration in 50- to 85-kg growing pigs fed diets with different concentrations of digestible phosphorus

Lagos L. V., C. L. Walk, M. R. Murphy, H. H. Stein. 2019. Effects of dietary digestible calcium on growth performance and bone ash concentration in 50- to 85-kg growing pigs fed diets with different concentrations of digestible phosphorus. Anim. Feed Sci. Technol. 247: 262 - 272. Link to full text.

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Influence of the concentration of dietary digestible calcium on growth performance, bone ash, and abundance of genes involved in intestinal absorption of calcium in pigs from 11 to 25 kg fed diets with different concentrations of digestible phosphorus

Requirements for P for growing pigs are expressed as the requirement for standardized total tract digestible (STTD) P, whereas requirements for Ca are usually expressed as requirements for total Ca. It is, however, recognized that diets for pigs are most accurately formulated based on a STTD Ca:STTD P ratio, and recent work has generated values for STTD of Ca in most Ca containing feed ingredients, which makes it possible to formulate diets based on STTD Ca.

Recent data from the University of Illinois have indicated that if STTD P is at the requirement, a ratio between STTD Ca and STTD P that is less than 1.35:1, 1.25:1, and 1.10:1 maximizes growth performance of pigs from 25 to 50 kg, 50 to 85 kg, and 100 to 130 kg, respectively. However, the STTD Ca:STTD P ratio needed to maximize bone ash is greater than the ratio needed to maximize growth performance. An attempt to estimate the requirement for STTD Ca by pigs from 11 to 25 kg was also made, but due to a reduction in ADG and G:F as dietary Ca increased, an optimal STTD Ca:STTD P ratio could not be estimated.

Calcium may be absorbed by transcellular or paracellular transport. Transcellular transport is the primary route if dietary Ca is low, but if dietary Ca is adequate or high, Ca is mainly absorbed using the paracellular route via the tight junctions. However, there are limited data demonstrating effects of dietary Ca concentration on abundance of genes related to transcellular and paracellular transport of Ca in the small intestine of pigs.

Therefore, the objectives of this experiment were to test the hypotheses that a STTD Ca:STTD P ratio less than 1.40:1 maximizes growth performance of pigs from 11 to 25 kg and that increasing dietary Ca downregulates abundance of genes related to transcellular absorption of Ca and tight junction proteins in the small intestine.

 

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Effect of dietary calcium on growth performance of growing pigs

Lee, S. A., Vanessa Lagos, and Hans H. Stein. 2018. Effect of dietary calcium on growth performance of growing pigs. Pages 173 - 184. XXXIV Specialization Course FEDNA, Madrid, Nov. 22 - 23, 2018. Link to full text (.pdf)

 

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Nutritional value of high-lysine sorghum, red sorghum, white sorghum, and yellow dent corn fed to growing pigs

Sorghum is used as an alternative to corn due to its lower cost and wide availability. However, conventional sorghum contains high concentration of tannin and phytate, which act as antinutritional factors. Use of microbial phytase may hydrolyze phytate and subsequently improve P absorption. High-lysine sorghum is a new variety of sorghum which may be comparable to other cereal grains and may serve as alternative to corn for pigs. However, there are at this point no data for effects of adding phytase to diets containing sorghum and no data to demonstrate the nutritional value of high-lysine sorghum.

Therefore, 2 experiments were conducted to test the hypothesis that inclusion of 500 phytase units (FTU)/kg of microbial phytase improves the standardized total tract digestibility (STTD) of P in sorghum varieties. The second hypothesis was that the STTD of P, as well as concentrations of digestible energy (DE) and metabolizable energy (ME) in high-lysine sorghum is not different from that of corn and other sources of sorghum.

 

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Enzymatic digestion turns food waste into feed for growing pigs

Jinno Cynthia, Yijie He, Dan Morash, Emily McNamara, Steve Zicari, Annie King, Hans H, Stein, Yanhong Liu. 2018. Enzymatic digestion turns food waste into feed for growing pigs. Anim. Feed Sci. Technol. 242:48-58. Link to full text

Effects of full fat rice bran and defatted rice bran on growth performance and carcass characteristics of growing-finishing pigs

Casas, G. A., M. F. Overholt, A. C. Dilger, D. D. Boler, and H. H. Stein. 2018. Effects of full fat rice bran and defatted rice bran on growth performance and carcass characteristics of growing-finishing pigs. J. Anim. Sci. 96:2293–2309. Link to abstract

Effects of different levels of full fat rice bran or defatted rice bran on growth performance and carcass quality of pigs

Casas, G. A. and H. H. Stein. 2018. Effects of different levels of full fat rice bran or defatted rice bran on growth performance and carcass quality of pigs. J. Anim. Sci. 96(Suppl. 2):174-175 (Abstr.) Link to abstract (.pdf)

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Effects of a novel phytase on growth performance, bone measurements, and Ca and P digestibility in diets fed to growing pigs

Blavi, L., J. N. Broomhead, and H. H. Stein. 2018. Effects of a novel phytase on growth performance, bone measurements, and Ca and P digestibility in diets fed to growing pigs. J. Anim. Sci. 96(Suppl. 2):163 (Abstr.) Link to abstract (.pdf)

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Comparison between a novel phytase and a commercial phytase on growth performance and bone measurements in diets fed to growing pigs

Munoz Alfonso, C. J., L. Blavi, J. N. Broomhead, and H. H. Stein. 2018. Comparison between a novel phytase and a commercial phytase on growth performance and bone measurements in diets fed to growing pigs. J. Anim. Sci. 96(Suppl. 2):147-148 (Abstr.) Link to abstract (.pdf)

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Young Scholar Presentation: Nutritional value of rice coproducts fed to pigs

Casas, G. A. and H. H. Stein. 2018. Young Scholar Presentation: Nutritional value of rice coproducts fed to pigs. J. Anim. Sci. 96(Suppl. 2):143 (Abstr.) Link to abstract (.pdf)

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